"The World is Our Stage: The Global Rhetorical Presidency and the Cold War" @ The Community Library
5:30 pm
Crowds swarm when U.S. presidents travel abroad, though many never hear their voices. The presidential body, moving from one secured location to another, communicates as much or more to these audiences than the texts of their speeches. In “The World is Our Stage,” Allison M. Prasch considers how presidential appearances overseas broadcast American superiority during the Cold War. Drawing on extensive archival research, Prasch examines five foundational moments in the development of what she calls the “global rhetorical presidency:” Truman at Potsdam, Eisenhower’s “Goodwill Tours,” Kennedy in West Berlin, Nixon in the People’s Republic of China, and Reagan in Normandy. In each case, Prasch reveals how the president’s physical presence defined the boundaries of the “Free World” and elevated the United States as the central actor in Cold War geopolitics. This program is presented in partnership with the Frank Church Institute at Boise State University. The event will be livestreamed and available to view later. Allison M. Prasch is assistant professor of rhetoric, politics, and culture at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She will be joined by Sam Martin, scholar of public address and political communication with the Frank Church Institute.
The Argyros
Mar 1 @ 7:30 pm
The Moth Mainstage @ The Argyros | Ketchum | Idaho | United States
7:30 pm
Curated events featuring five tellers who develop and shape their stories with The Moth directors. Moth stories are true, as remembered by the storyteller and always told live. Beyond theater, The Moth Mainstage is a community where entertainment and enlightenment merge.
The Tale of Franz Kafka's Archives at the National Library of Israel with Dr. Stefan Litt @ The Community Library
6:00 pm
The National Library of Israel has the honor of holding the third largest collection in the world of Franz Kafka’s original manuscripts, letters, and drawings; it represents a significant perspective of Kafka’s legacy. While Kafka did not foresee the sacred value of his work, his friend Max Brod, who was part of Kafka’s literary circle, did and he preserved Kafka’s material even when instructed not to do so. Dr. Stefan Litt, Humanities Curator of the National Library of Israel, will not only share highlights of the Kafka archives, but will tell the story behind the Kafka collection and how it ultimately came to the National Library of Israel. Stefan Litt received his PhD in Pre-Modern History from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has researched and taught at the universities of Erfurt, Duesseldorf, Graz and Bar-Ilan in Israel, and has published on the history of early modern European Jewry and on Jewish archives and book culture. He was awarded the Rosl and Paul Arnsberg Prize for his research. Since 2010, he has worked as an archivist at the National Library of Israel, responsible for the foreign language holdings. In 2018, Dr. Litt assumed the position of Humanities Curator of the ...

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